Vegetable Mafé

Finally I offer this recipe for an African-inspired stew. It was wonderful, even better the next day as most stews are. I still have a few hot peppers which are basically just drying out in the refrigerator, so I used them in place of the serranos this recipe calls for. The cabbage was the quarter head still in the vegetable crisper. No butternut squash still in your pantry? Just add more rutabagas or sweet potatoes. And maybe you’re one of those brilliant souls who took Suzanne’s suggestion and canned your own tomatoes this summer when they were in such abundance. The perfect accompaniment? MB cornbread or corn muffins.

Adapted from a recipe in “The Cornbread Gospels” by Crescent Dragonwagon (Workman, $14.95).

Daikon Cake

I have to admit that finding new uses for the daikon radish had been stumping me. It’s so often turned into a quick pickle or used in kimchi, and that’s where I was stuck.

Then I ran into this recipe for Luo Bo Gao, a Chinese daikon cake, a mainstay at dim sum restaurants with its crisp exterior and soft interior. I can’t wait to try this, especially since I have a little bag of dried shrimp in the freezer. I was wondering what in the world I was going to do with it.

Beetroot and Carrot Crackers

This recipe also uses beets (have I mentioned how much I love beets?) and it’s sort of a specialty thing. If you don’t have a dehydrator, you can stop reading now. This recipe is from British “cook” Karen Knowles who has a raw food blog and has offered several very tasty dehydrated cracker recipes. I look forward to making these this weekend. Beetroot is of course the very descriptive British name for what we in the colonies call “beets”.

Arugula Vichyssoise

If you’re wondering what to do with your arugula besides use it in a salad on or a sandwich, how about making soup? Again, not sure where the recipe came from, but this is just a variation on the classic vichyssoise. Now vichyssoise is usually served cold, but there’s no reason you can’t serve it piping hot. No leek? Onions or shallots will do in a pinch.

Red Flannel Potato Latkes

Happy Hanukkah! So for this first night, latkes are de rigueur, no matter what your religious persuasion. I love this recipe for latkes made with beets. When you see “red flannel” in the name of a recipe, of course, it means you can count on finding beets. Red flannel hash with corned beef anyone?

I wish I could remember where this recipe came from. If you don’t have a celery root hanging about, more potatoes or more beets will make a fine substitute

Vegetable Pot Pie

The folks at Moore Farms and Friends offer an alternative to the traditional CSA and in their weekly e-newsletter, they included this recipe. I thought it was a great explanation of how interesting recipes and dishes get developed. Enjoy it with any of the roots in today’s box. This is copied straight from Laurie’s email.